International arctic systems for observing the atmosphere: An International Polar Year Legacy Consortium

TitleInternational arctic systems for observing the atmosphere: An International Polar Year Legacy Consortium
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsT Uttal, S Starkweather,, T Vihma, AP Makshtas, LS Darby, JF Burkhart, CJ Cox, LN Schmeisser, T Haiden, M Maturilli, MD Shupe, G De Boer, A Saha, AA Grachev, SM Crepinsek, L Bruhwiler, B Goodison, B McArthur, VP Walden, EJ Dlugokencky, POG Persson, G Lesins, T Laurila, JA Ogren, R Stone, CN Long, S Sharma, A Massling, DD Turner, DM Stanitski, E Asmi, M Aurela, H Skov, K Eleftheriadis, A Virkkula, A Platt, EJ Førland, Y Iijima, IE Nielsen, MH Bergin, L Candlish, NS Zimov, SA Zimov, NT O'Neill, PF Fogal, R Kivi, EA Konopleva-Akish, J Verlinde, VY Kustov, B Vasel, VM Ivakhov, Y Viisanen, and JM Intrieri
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume97
Issue6
Start Page1033
Pagination1033 - 1056
Date Published06/2016
Abstract

©2016 American Meteorological Society. International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) activities and partnerships were initiated as a part of the 2007-09 International Polar Year (IPY) and are expected to continue for many decades as a legacy program. The IASOA focus is on coordinating intensive measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected in the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland to create synthesis science that leads to an understanding of why and not just how the Arctic atmosphere is evolving. The IASOA premise is that there are limitations with Arctic modeling and satellite observations that can only be addressed with boots-on-the-ground, in situ observations and that the potential of combining individual station and network measurements into an integrated observing system is tremendous. The IASOA vision is that by further integrating with other network observing programs focusing on hydrology, glaciology, oceanography, terrestrial, and biological systems it will be possible to understand the mechanisms of the entire Arctic system, perhaps well enough for humans to mitigate undesirable variations and adapt to inevitable change.

DOI10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00145.1
Short TitleBulletin of the American Meteorological Society